1792 Unzen Landslide and Tsunami Disaster

1792 Unzen Landslide and Tsunami Disaster

LCI : JPN1611131539
Main Information
Landslide Name : 1792 Unzen Landslide and Tsunami Disaster
Latitude : 32:46:13.24 N
Longitude : 130:30:0.82 E
Location
City / District : Shimabara
Province : Nagasaki
Country : Japan
Reporter
Reporter 1 : Khang Dang
Reporter 2 : Kyoji Sassa
Landslide Type
Material : Complex
Movement : Slide
Velocity (mm/sec) : Extremely Rapid
Depth (m) : Very Deep
Slope (degree) : Moderate
Volume (m³) : Extremely Large
Date of Occurence
Date of Occurence : May 21, 1792
Other Information
Land Use Source area : Forest
Run-out/deposition area : Urban area, Road, Railways, Sea/lake
Other Activity : Active in the past
Triggering Factor : Earthquake
Death(s) & Missing : 15153
Houses and other structural damage : -
Photo of landslide : 1792 Unzen Landslide and Tsunami Disaster-Photo.jpg
Google earth kmz file : 1792 Unzen Landslide and Tsunami Disaster.kmz
Plan of landslide : 1792 Unzen Landslide and Tsunami Disaster-Plan.jpg
Cross section of landslide : 1792 Unzen Landslide and Tsunami Disaster-Section.jpg
Reference (paper/report) : http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10346-016-0691-9
Testing graph : Testing Graph.JPG
Monitoring graph : Monitoring Graph.JPG
Video of moving landslides including 3D simulation : https://youtu.be/QoQboDi7dQw
Description :

The 1792 Unzen-Mayuyama megaslide in Japan (volume, 3.4 x 108 m3; maximum depth 400 m) killed 10,139 persons directly by the displaced landslide mass in the Shimabara area. The landslide mass also entering into the Ariake Sea where it triggered a tsunami wave. This landslide-induced tsunami wave killed 4,653 people in Kumamoto Prefecture, 343 people on Amakusa Island and 18 people in other areas (Usami, 1996). Simulations of this landslide and tsunami have already been made using LS-RAPID and LS-Tsunami in Sassa et al. (2014, 2016). Source: Sassa, K., Dang, K., Yanagisawa, H. et al. Landslides (2016). A new landslide-induced tsunami simulation model and its application to the 1792 Unzen-Mayuyama landslide-and-tsunami disaster. Landslides, First Online. doi:10.1007/s10346-016-0691-9