Kuridaira Landslide Dam

Kuridaira Landslide Dam

LCI : JPN169151630
Main Information
Landslide Name : Kuridaira Landslide Dam
Latitude : 34:4:33.51 N
Longitude : 135:50:7.92 E
Location
City / District : Nara
Province : Nara
Country : Japan
Reporter
Reporter 1 : Pham Tien
Reporter 2 :
Landslide Type
Material : Rock, Debris, Earth
Movement : Slide
Velocity (mm/sec) : Extremely Rapid
Depth (m) : Very Deep
Slope (degree) : Steep
Volume (m³) : Very Large
Date of Occurence
Date of Occurence : Sep 03, 2011
Other Information
Land Use Source area : Forest
Run-out/deposition area : River
Other Activity : Active in the past
Triggering Factor : Rainfall
Death(s) & Missing : -
Houses and other structural damage : -
Photo of landslide : A combined photo of the Kuridaira landslide, May 2014.JPG
Google earth kmz file : Kuridaira landslide.kmz
Plan of landslide : Plan of the Kuridaira landslide on Sep. 8, 2011 (Photo by the Google Earth).JPG
Cross section of landslide : A cross section A-A of the Kuridaira landslide.JPG
Reference (paper/report) : SABO (2013) A Pamphlet released in October, 2013 on overview of the 2011 disaster induced by Typhoon No. 12, Implementation of an urgent investigation and countermeasures to disaster areas. Kii Mountain District SABO Office, Kinki Regional Development Bureau. The Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT). Available at http://www.kkr.mlit.go.jp/kiisanchi/outline/, 24 pages (in Japanese).
Testing graph : The simulation of rainfall-induced landslide by pore water pressure control test.JPG
Monitoring graph : -
Video of moving landslides including 3D simulation : -
Description :

On 3 September 2011, a large-scale deep-seated landslide was triggered by heavy rainfall produced by Typhoon Talas in the Kuridaira valley, Totsukawa village, Nara Prefecture, Japan. The landslide with 850 m in length, 600 m in width and a maximum depth of 120 m became the largest biggest landslide in the 2011 disaster. The collapsed sediment estimated to be 25 million m3. The sliding soil mass moved down and then blocked a river to form a natural landslide dam in a large basin area approximately 8.7 km2. The dam had a water storage capacity of 7.5 million cubic meters.